Tools
Back to Results

Three Different Radiation Therapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer


Title

Lung Cancer - Thoracic Radiotherapy Regimens in Patients with Limited Small Cell Lung Cancer

Therapeutic Area Lung Cancer
Principal Investigator Kathryn Huber MD
Min Age 18 Years
Gender both
Contact George Mensing
617-636-7123
More Information http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00632853

Overview

The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, good and/or bad, of two different ways to give radiation therapy. One of the ways is experimental, while one of them is standard.  Everyone will get the chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide, which has been established through clinical trials to be standard drugs (chemotherapy) for this type of cancer.

Study Details

Inclusion Criteria

  • Participants must be diagnosed with small cell lung cancer.
  • Participants must not have had prior chemotherapy or radiation treatment

Exclusion Criteria

  • People who have had surgery that completely removed the cancer are not eligible.
  • People with inadequate liver, kidnery, and bone marrow function are not eligible.
  • People whose tumor(s) are too small to be measured are not eligible.

Study Requirements

The experimental way of giving the radiation therapy is once a day with a high dose of radiation for 7 weeks. The standard way of giving the radiation therapy is to give it twice a day for 3 weeks. Although this is the typical way that many hospitals give radiation, both ways are considered standard options at Tufts Medical Center. Everyone will get the chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide, which has been established through clinical trials to be standard drugs (chemotherapy) for your type of cancer. Participants will be receiving the study radiation/drugs  for about 3-4 months. Following treatment, they will receive follow-up examinations at least every 3 months for 2 years, every 6 months for 3 years, and then at least every year for 5 years.