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Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or make it thicker and more rigid than normal. In rare cases, scar tissue replaces the muscle tissue.

Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have it. In others, however, it can make the heart less able to pump blood through the body. This can cause serious complications, including

  • Heart failure
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Heart valve problems
  • Sudden cardiac arrest

Heart attacks, high blood pressure, infections, and other diseases can all cause cardiomyopathy. Some types of cardiomyopathy run in families. In many people, however, the cause is unknown. Treatment might involve medicines, surgery, other medical procedures, and lifestyle changes.

Programs + Services


Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center

Explore the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Center at Tufts Medical Center in Boston which offers a full suite of cardiomyopathy treatment and diagnostic options.
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Changing the narrative on a once grim genetic cardiac disease

Cardiovascular specialists at Tufts MC are spreading the word that Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is now a treatable disease compatible with normal longevity and good quality of life.
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Doctors + Care Team

James E. Udelson, MD

James E. Udelson, MD

Title(s): Chief, Division of Cardiology; Director, Nuclear Cardiology Laboratory; Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Medicine, CardioVascular Center, Cardiology
Appt. Phone: 617-636-8066
Fax #: 617-636-7175

Cardiac imaging, heart failure

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Ayan R. Patel, MD

Ayan R. Patel, MD

Title(s): Director, Cardiovascular Imaging and Hemodynamic Laboratory; Director, Women's Heart Center; Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Medicine, CardioVascular Center, Cardiology
Appt. Phone: 617-636-2273
Fax #: 617-636-8070

Echocardiography, heart failure, women's heart disease

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Ethan  Rowin, MD

Ethan Rowin, MD

Title(s): Co-Director, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center; Director of Cardiac MR Imaging; Assistant Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Medicine, CardioVascular Center, Cardiology
Appt. Phone: 617-636-8066
Fax #: 617-636-7175

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

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Hassan Rastegar, MD

Hassan Rastegar, MD

Title(s): Senior Cardiothoracic Surgeon; Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Surgery, CardioVascular Center, Cardiac Surgery
Appt. Phone: 617-636-5590
Fax #: 617-636-6410

Surgical treatment of acquired heart disease, surgical repair of valvular heart disease, surgical repair of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, minimally invasive surgery, arrhythmia surgery, heart transplantation, circulatory assist devices

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Martin S. Maron, MD

Martin S. Maron, MD

Title(s): Director, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center; Co-Director, Cardiac CT and MRI; Assistant Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Medicine, CardioVascular Center, Cardiology
Appt. Phone: 617-636-8066
Fax #: 617-636-7175

Cardiac imaging, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

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Research + Clinical Trials


A Study of a Technology-enabled Disease Management Program to Reduce Hospitalizations for Heart Failure (SpanCHFIII)

This study will randomize participants with a diagnosis of congestive heart failure and at least one risk factor for hospitalization to either a tablet computer and web based disease management program or a telephone based disease management program. Both interventions are home based with heart failure education and symptom monitoring provided by nurse managers. The nurse managers are in close communication with both the participants and the participants' physicians . The components of the disease management program have been developed at Tufts Medical Center and the New England Quality Care Alliance with studies showing improved clinical outcomes, including reduced hospitalizations. The goal of this study is to transition this successful home monitoring and disease management program to a table computer and web-based implementation to both improve clinical outcomes (reducing hospitalizations and improving self-perceived health status) and improve provider-patient satisfaction. We hypothesize that the tablet computer based disease management will decrease heart failure hospitalizations.
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Mechanical Circulatory Support: Measures of Adjustment and Quality of Life

The purpose of this study is to develop a measurement system to assess adjustment to mechanical circulatory support (MCS) (also referred to as a ventricular assist device [VAD]) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with advanced heart failure who receive a VAD. The investigators refer to this measurement system as Mechanical Circulatory Support: Adjustment and Quality of Life (MCS A-QOL).
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A Phase 2 Open-label Pilot Study to Evaluate Efficacy, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Safety, and Tolerability of MYK-461 in Subjects With Symptomatic Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction

The purpose of this phase 2 open-label pilot study is to evaluate the efficacy, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), safety, and tolerability of MYK-461 in subjects with symptomatic HCM and LVOT obstruction aged 18-70 years.
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A Randomized Parallel-Group, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Event-Driven, Multi-Center Pivotal Phase III Clinical Outcome Trial of Efficacy and Safety of the Oral sGC Stimulator Vericiguat in Subjects With Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction (HFrEF) - VerICiguaT Global Study in Subjects With Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction (VICTORIA)

This is a randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multi-center, double-blind, event driven study of vericiguat (MK-1242) in participants with heart failure reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The primary hypothesis is vericiguat (MK-1242) is superior to placebo in increasing the time to first occurrence of the composite of cardiovascular (CV) death or heart failure (HF) hospitalization in participants with HFrEF.
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