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Mercedes C. Lyson, PhD


Overview

Research Interests Sociology of health, sociology of the body, health interventions, qualitative methods, mHealth, social theory, urban studies, food studies
Gender Female

Publications + National Presentations

1. Lyson, Mercedes C. "The Class Politics of Alternative Food: Informing Public Health Policy and Remedying Health Inequality." Sociology Compass 8.10 (2014): 1216-1228.

2. Lyson, Mercedes C., and Stephen Zavestoski. "Chapter 5 : Obesity, the alternative food movement, and complete streets." The Public Shaping of Medical Research: Patient Associations, Health Movements and Biomedicine (2014): 89. Brown, Phil, Mercedes Lyson, and Tania Jenkins. "From diagnosis to social diagnosis." Social Science & Medicine 73.6 (2011): 939-943.

3. Morello-Frosch, Rachel, Phil Brown, Mercedes Lyson, Alison Cohen, and Kimberly Krupa. "Community voice, vision, and resilience in post-Hurricane Katrina recovery." Environmental Justice 4, no. 1 (2011): 71-80.

4. Brown, Phil, Brian Mayer, Stephen Zavestoski, Theo Luebke, Joshua Mandelbaum, Sabrina McCormick, and Mercedes Lyson. "The health politics of asthma: environmental justice and collective illness experience in the United States." Social science & medicine 57, no. 3 (2003): 453-464.

Biography

Mercedes C. Lyson, PhD, is a sociologist by training, a background infused with ample interdisciplinary experience. Her doctoral research at Brown University examined the coupling between the alternative food movement and public health interventions aimed at ameliorating obesity and health disparities. She recently completed a postdoctoral research year at Northeastern University in their Departments of Computer Science and Health Science where she worked on an Aetna Foundation grant to conduct a national evaluation of digital/mobile health community-based interventions.

Her past research efforts embody the continuing themes of health/wellbeing, health interventions, and vulnerable populations/social stratification. She now works with the Program on Health, Work, and Productivity within the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies.