Myeloma

Myeloproliferative disorders includes a group of conditions that cause red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets to form abnormally in the bone marrow.

Programs + Services


John C. Davis Myeloma and Amyloid Program

The John C. Davis Myeloma and Amyloid Program at Tufts Medical Center in Boston is home to some of the world’s top experts in plasma cell disease.
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Doctors + Care Team

Andreas K. Klein, MD

Andreas K. Klein, MD

Accepting New Patients

Virtual Appointments Available

Title(s): Associate Chief, Division of Hematology Oncology; Director, Hematologic Malignancies Program; Director, Bone Marrow and Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Program; Regulatory Affairs Director, CTSI; Associate Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Medicine, Hematology/Oncology
Appt. Phone: 617-636-6227
Fax #: 617-636-8538

Lymphoma, myeloma, bone marrow transplantation (BMT), immune reconstitution after BMT

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Cindy Varga, MD

Cindy Varga, MD

Accepting New Patients

Virtual Appointments Available

Title(s): Medical Oncologist; Assistant Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Medicine, Hematology/Oncology
Appt. Phone: 617-636-6227
Fax #: 617-636-8538

Malignant hematology (plasma cell dyscrasia, leukemia, lymphoma)

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Raymond L. Comenzo, MD

Raymond L. Comenzo, MD

Accepting New Patients

Virtual Appointments Available

Title(s): Director, Transfusion Services; Director, John C. Davis Myeloma and Amyloid Program; Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Medicine, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hematology/Oncology
Appt. Phone: 617-636-6454
Fax #: 617-636-3175

Myeloma, amyloidosis, stem cell transplant, transfusion medicine

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Research + Clinical Trials


EAA171: Optimizing Prolonged Treatment In Myeloma Using MRD Assessment (OPTIMUM)

The goal of this study is to determine whether escalating maintenance therapy with the addition of ixazomib to lenalidomide improves overall survival among patients who are minimal residual disease (MRD) positive after approximately 1 year of lenalidomide maintenance following an early stem cell transplant (≤ 12 months from diagnosis).

This phase III trial studies how well lenalidomide in combination with ixazomib works compared to lenalidomide alone in treating patients with evidence of residual multiple myeloma after stem cell transplantation. Lenalidomide may help shrink or slow the growth of multiple myeloma. Ixazomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving lenalidomide and ixazomib together may work better than giving lenalidomide alone in treating patients with evidence of residual multiple myeloma after a stem cell transplantation.

This study involves pre-registration (Step 0) and randomization (Step 1). Bone marrow specimen must be submitted for central MRD assessment and results will determine step 1 eligibility. 
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