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Neurology

Neurology Residency Program

Message from Program Directors

We personally thank you for your interest in Tufts Medical Center Neurology Residency and Fellowship Training Programs in Boston. This is a wonderful time to be going into our field and there are vast opportunities available for residents completing our program. Whether one chooses an academic, community or laboratory investigative career, we strive during your three brief years of neurology residency training to provide the clinical approach and poise required to be a first rate neurologist.

All future success follows from a firm grounding in clinical work and the ability to become a clinical thinker. Our neurology residency and fellowship programs stand out because of highly committed bedside teaching and a regular schedule of formal rounds that allow for the transmission of experiential knowledge that cannot be acquired from published sources. We pride ourselves on our professional and mature residents and continue to feel close and loyal to them well beyond their years with us in Boston. It is evident when we encounter a graduate of the program at a national meeting that we have met our goal of turning out master clinicians.

We, and the over 40 full-time academic faculty of Tufts MC Neurology, have built the program around training and, as our residents and graduates can attest, are genuinely dedicated to the house staff and their professional education. We look forward to hearing about your interest in neurology as a career and hope that Tufts will be the program that best suits your views and goals.

Kimberly Parkerson, MD, PhD
Director, Tufts Neurology Residency Training Program

Thomas D. Sabin, MD
Director Emeritus, Tufts Neurology Residency Training Program
Vice Chairman of Neurology, Tufts Medical Center

Overview

Training superior clinical neurologists

The mission of the Tufts Neurology Residency Training Program is to train superior clinical neurologists (“master clinicians”). It is our intention to train individuals who will succeed in their professional lives in any endeavor they choose: patient care, research or teaching. We provide this training within a collegial atmosphere of mutual respect, maintaining a constant focus on the well-being of our patients.

We are able to do so because of the strengths of our more than 40 faculty members in our three institutions: Tufts Medical Center, Lahey Hospital & Medical Center and St. Elizabeth's Medical Center. These individuals have diverse sub-specialty interests and skills but share a desire to provide in-depth and personal training with a unified philosophy regarding the value of clinical medicine.

The location of our institutions and the reputation of our staff allow for resident exposure to the full spectrum of neurologic problems. Our residents gain extensive experience in community neurology and in outpatient clinical settings while continuing to receive ample exposure to our traditional strengths of tertiary care and neurologic intensive care.

Program Structure

Our program is ACGME-accredited and offers 5 positions through the NRMP (“The Match”). In addition, we may offer 1-2 additional positions for highly qualified candidates with government sponsorship, typically through the Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission (SACM), in our Funded Applicant-FAP track. The candidates through our FAP track will be endorsed by our international office.

PGY-1 Preliminary Medicine Year

For those candidates matching into our 5 standard positions, our Neurology residency program offers the option for our residents to complete their preliminary medicine year with us at either Lahey Hospital & Medical Center (3 positions) or at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center (2 positions). These positions do not require a separate interview, though you must apply for these programs in the match, and they must be ranked on the supplemental drop-down list on NRMP (#3130140P1 Med-Prelim/Neurology - Tufts Lahey Clinic-MA and #1266140P1 Med Prelim/Neurology - Tufts St Elizabeth’s Med Ctr-MA). Candidates also have the option of joining us only for advanced neurology training (PGY-2 through PGY-4) and completing their preliminary medicine year at another institution. Candidates who join us through the FAP track do not have guaranteed preliminary medicine positions through our program and must match separately.

View the preliminary medicine training programs at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center and St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center.

PGY-2 Year: First Year Neurology Residency

Our program offers a robust curriculum in which our residents are exposed early to a vast amount of inpatient neurology while they build a solid foundation in clinical examination, pattern recognition, diagnosis and management. Our residents rotate through two sites during the PGY-2 year: Tufts Medical Center and Lahey Hospital & Medical Center.

At Tufts Medical Center, residents spend time on the inpatient, consult, night float, and outpatient rotations. They are exposed to both typical and atypical presentations of neurologic conditions, made even more interesting by the three weekly live patient conferences led by Dr. Thomas Sabin. Residents also rotate through the Neely Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit where they are exposed to complex and critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients. At Lahey Hospital & Medical Center, residents are assigned to inpatient, consult and night float rotations. The ward and consult services are very busy, and residents are exposed to a wide variety of neurological cases.

Time spent on various rotations varies slightly year to year depending on the total number of residents. A typical schedule is as follows:

LHMC wards

16-18 weeks

TMC wards

6-8 weeks

NCCU

4 weeks

Night Float (TMC or LHMC)

10-12 weeks

Outpatient Clinic (TMC)

4 weeks

Consults (TMC or LHMC)

2-4 weeks

Vacation

4 weeks

PGY-3 Year

The PGY-3 year is comprised of a number of diverse rotations, with the main goal of supplementing the clinical experience gained in the PGY-2 year with the study of neuropathology/oncology, neurophysiology, and pediatric neurology. Continued exposure to adult clinical neurology takes place while rotating though consult services. Rotations are based primarily at Tufts Medical Center and at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center. Residents may spend several weeks on the consult service at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center as well. In addition, residents will have several weeks of elective of their choice to allow for further exploration of subspecialty interests or research. At the end of the year, some of the PGY-3 residents will serve as chief resident on the ward services at Tufts Medical Center and Lahey Hospital & Medical Center

Pediatric Neurology (Floating Hospital)

12 weeks

Neuroradiology

2 weeks

Consults

(TMC-LHMC-SEMC)

10-12 weeks

Night Float

4-6 weeks

Neuropathology and Neuro-oncology

4 weeks

EMG

4 weeks

NCCU

4 weeks

EEG

2 weeks

Elective

4-6 weeks

Vacation

4 weeks

PGY-4 Year

The PGY-4 year gives residents the opportunity to broaden their clinical experience with elective rotations as well as consolidate and hone their clinical skills while overseeing the ward services at Tufts Medical Center and Lahey Hospital & Medical Center. Residents also spend time at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center as the consult resident and completing their psychiatry rotation.

TMC or LHMC Ward Chief

20 weeks

Outpatient Clinic (TMC)

4 weeks

Psychiatry

4 weeks

Consults (SEMC)

6 weeks

Night Float

1-2 weeks

Elective

12-14 weeks

Vacation

4 Weeks

Continuity Clinic

Each resident attends a longitudinal outpatient clinic one afternoon per week at one of the institutions. Clinic preceptors are assigned at the beginning of residency, and the preceptor serves as one of the resident’s mentors for all three years. The importance of serial observation, the natural history of disease and response to treatment, and the commitment to patients is emphasized.

Electives

Elective rotations are available at our institutions in all major neurologic subspecialties as well as related medical, surgical, and radiologic fields. In addition, elective time can be spent on clinical or basic research projects.

Call Schedule

Our program has moved from a traditional call schedule to a night float system, which promotes good sleep hygiene, decreases burnout and complies with work hours under ACGME rules. Night coverage takes place at Tufts Medical Center and at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center.

A 24-hour traditional call is still in place on Friday, covered almost exclusively by the consult residents at Tufts and Lahey, in order to maximize continuity of care. Similarly, weekend shifts from 7 am to 7 pm are typically covered by the junior ward residents, with each resident covering two weekends and having two free weekends over a four week period.

While ward chief resident at Tufts Medical Center, senior residents take home call and round on the weekends with the junior resident and attending for two weekends of each four week period.

Teaching

As part of our dedication to clinical neurology education, ample emphasis is placed on the teaching role of the resident. The ward and consult services typically have two to four medical students who derive the bulk of their clinical neurology knowledge from teaching provided by our residents. More formal teaching opportunities are also available, including the instruction of small groups of second year medical students during their neuroscience course each fall.

In addition, each Friday morning, we hold a resident-run teaching session during which a lecture prepared by our residents is presented to their colleagues among our residency sites via teleconference. Topics include board review questions, neuroanatomy and evidence-based practice topics. Most of these sessions are supervised by a subspecialty attending of the particular topic. Senior residents are also responsible for Grand Round didactics at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center while rotating there, which provides a great opportunity to hone topic pertinent literature review skills as well as build confidence in addressing a room full of established neurologists and colleagues.

Faculty

David E. Thaler, MD, PhD, FAHA
Chairman, Department of Neurology
Associate Professor of Neurology
Director, the Comprehensive Stroke Center
800 Washington Street,  Box 314
Boston, MA 02111
617-636-5854

Thomas D. Sabin, MD
Vice-Chairman, Department of Neurology
Professor of Neurology
800 Washington Street, Box 314
Boston, MA 02111
617-636-7592

Kimberly Parkerson, MD, PhD
Program Director, Residency Program
Assistant Professor of Neurology
800 Washington Street, Box 314
Boston, MA 02111
617-636-4856

Affiliate Site Chairs

Jayashri Srinivasan, MD, PhD, FACP
Chair, Department of Neurology
Associate Professor of Neurology
Lahey Clinic & Medical Center
41 Mall Rd. – Dept. of Neurology
Burlington, MA 01803
781-744-8630

David H. Weinberg, MD
Interim Chair, Department of Neurology
Associate Professor of Neurology
St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center
736 Cambridge St. – Dept. of Neurology
Brighton, MA 02135
617-789-2375

Affiliate Site Training Directors

Judith A. Hinchey, MD
Assistant Professor of Neurology
St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center
736 Cambridge St. – Dept. of Neurology
Brighton, MA 02135
617-789-3300

Doreen T. Ho, MD
Lahey Clinic & Medical Center
41 Mall Rd. – Dept. of Neurology
Burlington, MA 01803
781-744-8630

Current Residents

PGY-4

Abrar Al-Faraj, MD
Arabian Gulf University, Bahrain

Ali Daneshmand, MD
Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Bezhad Elahi, MD
Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Min Kang, MD
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA

Samhitha Rai, MD
Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

PGY-3

Adeeb Al Rizaiza, MD
University of Dammam College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia

Alexandra Filippakis, DO
University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine

Mam Ibraheem, MD
College of Medicine University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Jayesh Patel, DO
Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine

Jeffrey Steinberg, MD
Tufts University School of Medicine

Lee Sullivan, MD, MPH
Tufts University School of Medicine

PGY-2 photos and bios coming soon!

Alumni

2016

Ozaire Awais, MD
Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
Headache Fellowship

Vajjayantee Belle, MD
Olean General Hospital, NY
Private Practice

P. Monroe Butler, MD
Behavioral Neurology
University of California, San Francisco

Emile Moukheiber, MD
Movement Disorders
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Andrew Natonson, MD
Cognitive Neurology
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR

2015

Ziad Alhumayyd, MD
Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Matthew Dooley, MD
Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Neurorehabilitation Fellowship

Yasir Jassam, MD, PhD
NINDS/NIH, Baltimore, MD
Neuroimmunology Fellowship

Christopher Parres, MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship

2014

Murali Bogavalli, MD
Beth-Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Ashish Gajjar, MD
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Epilepsy Fellowship

Christoph Karch, MD, PhD
University of California, San Francisco
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Sui Li, MD
Lahey Clinic, Boston, MA
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Kit Mui, MD
University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA
Epilepsy Fellowship

Sarah Nelson, MD
Brigham and Women’s and Massachusetts General Hospitals, Boston, MA
Neurocritical Care Fellowship

Karen Rembold, MD
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA
Neuromuscular Fellowship

2013

Tareq Almaghrabi, MD
University of Texas, Houston
Neurocritical Care Fellowship

Maria Dibner, MD
Brown University, Providence, RI
Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship

Adam Drobnis, MD
Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY
Movement Disorders Fellowship

Meghan Hickey, MD
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
General Neurology Fellowship

Karen Lynch, MD
Brigham and Women’s and Massachusetts General Hospitals, Boston, MA
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Flavia Machado, MD
Tufts Medical Center and Southcoast Physicians Group, North Dartmouth, MA

Neuro-ophthalmology Fellowship and Private Practice

2012

Seth Gale, MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Behavioral/Cognitive Neurology Fellowship

Dimitry Kolychev, MD
Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
Stroke/Vascular Neurology Fellowship

Swee Lim, MD
Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Subhashie Sarathkumara, MD
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
Movement Disorders Fellowship

Shruti Sonni, MD
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA
Stroke/Vascular Neurology Fellowship

2011

Venkata Dandamudi, MD
Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
Neurocritical Care and Endovascular Surgery Fellowship

Christina Fournier, MD
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Joshua Kornbluth, MD
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
Neurocritical Care Fellowship

Abdulelah Naqshabandi, MD
Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Nicholas Parziale, MD
University of California, Los Angeles
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Mathew Pulicken, MD
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship

Louis Tramontozzi, MD
Brigham and Women’s and Massachusetts General Hospitals, Boston, MA
Neuromuscular Fellowship

Life as A Resident

What’s it like to live in Boston? It’s an epicenter for health, science and medical research – where visions are born and discoveries are made. With universities on every corner, intellectuals, scientists and artists mingle to create an exceptional culture.

It’s also a fun city that takes its sports teams seriously, but not much else. In the spring and summer, you can enjoy festivals, outdoor concerts and cultural gatherings. Plus, many neighborhoods are booming with art, restaurants and music. Need to get away? Boston is a short trip from beautiful beaches, mountains and lakes.

It’s the perfect mix of urban culture, a small town feel and outdoor beauty.

Learn more about what it’s like to live in Boston

Why Choose Tufts Medical Center

Residents complete their training at Tufts Medical Center, a world-class academic medical center located in Boston and the principal teaching hospital for Tufts University School of Medicine. Tufts Medical Center sponsors nineteen specialty ACGME-accredited clinical training programs.

Tufts Medical Center is a 415-bed robust organization, providing everything from routine medical care to treating the most complex diseases affecting adults and children. Tufts Medical Center is also home to the Floating Hospital for Children, a full-service children's hospital dedicated exclusively to all levels of pediatric care.

Tufts Medical Center provides heart, kidney and bone marrow transplants, is a level I trauma center, provides comprehensive neurological and neurosurgical care, and offers cutting-edge cancer treatments. The neurology department houses a comprehensive stroke program and a Level 4 Epilepsy Center. Tufts Medical Center is also home to The Boston Gamma Knife Center, the first and only Gamma Knife Center in Massachusetts and northern New England.

How to Apply

We participate in ERAS/NRMP, and applications must be submitted through these programs. Application materials should be submitted no later than October 15th two years prior to the beginning of the PGY-2 Neurology training year. For example, those wishing to start a Neurology residency in July of 2018 would submit their application before October 15th of 2016. Successful completion of a preliminary year of internal medicine is required prior to beginning neurology residency. We offer candidates in our traditional advanced track the option of matching into one of our guaranteed preliminary medicine positions (see below). The following information must be submitted to ERAS by the deadline in order for your application to be considered complete:

  • ERAS Application form
  • Curriculum Vitae, including any honors, publications and presentations
  • Medical School Performance Evaluation (MSPE) or Dean’s Letter
  • Official medical school transcript
  • USMLE scores (Step I required, Step II and III if available). COMLEX scores are accepted.
  • A minimum of three (3) letters of recommendation. It is recommended that the letters be written by someone who is very familiar with your clinical work and who is accustomed to writing letters of recommendation (Clerkship Director, Program Director, Director of Service or a senior clinician)
  • Personal Statement
  • Photograph
  • ECFMG certificate (for foreign medical grads)

To initiate your application and obtain information regarding dates and other key details, visit:

2016 interviews will be held on the following dates (all are Tuesdays):

November 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

December 6, 13

January 3, 10

We do offer guaranteed preliminary internal medicine (PGY-1) positions for applicants who match with the Tufts Adult Neurology Residency Program through our traditional track. These are not available for the government funded applicants (typically through the Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission) who apply through our FAP (funded applicant) track. Two medicine internship positions are available at St. Elizabeth's Medical Center and three at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center. If you are interested in one of these positions, you must apply to the program within ERAS and rank the programs in the supplemental match list, but you will not be required to interview separately. Alternatively, you can choose to apply to and match with any other PGY-1 preliminary medicine position in the U.S.

International Medical Graduates

We accept foreign graduates who are highly qualified and have competitive USMLE scores. see the Frequently Asked Questions section for more information regarding requirements for IMGs.

For more information, visit:

Frequently Asked Questions

What are your criteria for International Medical Graduates?

All IMGs must possess a valid ECFMG certificate prior to the ranking process in late January. ECFMG certification is not required for interview consideration.

What visas does your program sponsor?

Tufts Medical Center sponsors J-1 Visas for trainees. Our preliminary medicine programs do not sponsor H1-B visas. Only in rare exceptions will Tufts Medical Center sponsor H1-B visas for advanced training.

Learn more >

Does your program have a graduation cut-off limitation?

No, there is no limit to the number of years since medical school graduation. However, multiple year gaps without hands-on medical experience or training is not favorable.

Is United States clinical experience required?

While it is not required, US clinical experience is certainly of benefit, and it greatly increases the likelihood of an invitation to interview.

What are your USMLE score requirements?

We seek candidates with minimum scores of 200.

Do you require USMLE Step 2 CS and CK in order to make application to your program?

We do not require the above at the time of application; however, due to new licensing requirements by the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Medicine, the results of Step 2 are required by the time of the ranking process (late January).

Does your program offer a preliminary year of Internal Medicine training?

The Tufts Neurology Residency Program offers five guaranteed preliminary medicine positions, 2 at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center and 3 at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center for applicants in our traditional track.

How many letters of recommendation do you require?

A minimum of three (3) letters of recommendation are requested as part of the application.

How do I apply?

All applications are submitted through ERAS. Beginning in September 2016, we will start the process of reviewing applications for interview consideration. Interviews will take place from November 2016 through January 2017 to match for a PGY-2 position in 2018.

Salary + Benefits


Graduate Medical Education (GME) stipend levels:

 

2016-2017

PGY2 $60,015.00

PGY3 $62,830.00

PGY4 $65,795.00

For a complete benefits summary, please visit the GME section of our website >

Contact Us

To learn more, contact:

Crys S. Draconi, C-TAGME
Education Manager, Neurosciences
e-Mail: cdraconi@tuftsmedicalcenter.org
Phone: 617-636-2605