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David M. Kent, MD, CM, MS


Programs + Specialties
Training + Education McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Canada; Cambridge Hospital; University of Michigan Medical Center; Carney Hospital; The Cambridge Hospital
Board Certifications Internal Medicine
NPI # 1346357027
Gender Male
Accepted Insurances View Accepted Insurances at Tufts Medical Center

Tufts Medical Center Primary Care
800 Washington St., #235
Boston, MA 02111
Phone #: 617-636-5400
Fax #: 617-636-1384

1984-85 “CRC Award for Excellence in Chemistry”, as top student in Inorganic Chemistry. Also top student in Biochemistry, Physics, and Physical Chemistry, Binghamton University, State University of New York.

1986 “Outstanding Academic Achievement” Award and “James Wilmouth Award” as top graduate in Biology, State University of New York at Binghamton

1990-91 “Faculty Scholar,” McGill University, Faculty of Medicine, (awarded to top 10% of class each year)

1991 “University Scholar,” McGill University, Faculty of Medicine, (awarded to top 10% of graduating class)

1998 “Lee Lusted Award” for best research presentation (Second Prize), Society for Medical Decision Making, National Meeting, Cambridge, MA

1999 “Trainee Award” for best research presentation, Midwest Regional Society for General Internal Medicine Meeting, Chicago, IL

2000 Keynote Address, Tufts University School of Medicine Commencement

2000 Tufts University Faculty Recognition Award

2001-02 Tufts University School of Medicine, Faculty Recognition Award for Excellence in Teaching

2002 Pfizer Scholar in Clinical Epidemiology

2010 Invited Speaker, Princeton Stroke Conference, Boston

1. Kent DM, Ruthazer R, Weimar C, Mas JL, Serena J, Homma S, Di Angelantonio E, DiTullio MR, Lutz JS, Elkind MS, Griffith J, Jaigobin C, Mattle HP, Michel P, Mono ML, Nedeltchev K, Papetti F, Thaler DE. An Index to Identify Stroke-related versus Incidental Patent Foramen Ovale in Cryptogenic Stroke. Neurology 2013;81(7):619-625. PMCID: PMC3775694

2. Kitsios GD, Dahabreh IJ, Abu Dabrh AM, Thaler DE, Kent DM. Patent Foramen Ovale Closure and Medical Treatments for Secondary Stroke Prevention: A Systematic Review of Observational and Randomized Evidence. Stroke 2012;43(2):422-431. PMCID: PMC3342835

3. Dahabreh IJ, Kent DM. Index event bias as an explanation for the paradoxes of recurrence risk research. JAMA 2011;305(8):822-823. PMID: 21343582

4. Kent DM, Rothwell PM, Ioannidis JPA, Altman DG, Hayward RA. Assessing and Reporting Heterogeneity in Treatment Effects in Clinical Trials: A Proposal. Trials 2010;11(1):85. PMCID: PMCID: PMC2928211

5. Kent DM, Hayward RA. Limitations of applying summary results of clinical trials to individual patients: the need for risk stratification. JAMA 2007;298(10):1209-1212. PMID: 17848656

6. Alsheikh-Ali AA, Thaler DE, Kent DM. Patent Foramen Ovale in Cryptogenic Stroke: Incidental or Pathogenic? A Systematic Review and Bayesian Approach. Stroke 2009;40(7):2349-2355. PMCID: PMCID: PMC2764355

7. Trikalinos TA. Alsheikh-Ali AA. Tatsioni A. Nallamothu BK. Kent DM. Percutaneous coronary interventions for non-acute coronary artery disease: a quantitative 20-year synopsis and a network meta-analysis. Lancet 2009;373(9667):911-8. PMCID: PMC2967219

8. Kent DM, Selker HP, Ruthazer R, Bluhmki E, Hacke W. The stroke--thrombolytic predictive instrument: a predictive instrument for intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke. Stroke 2006;37:2957-2962. PMID: 17068305

9. Kent DM, Price LL, Ringleb PA, Hill MD, Selker HP. Sex-based differences in response to rt-PA in acute ischemic stroke: A pooled analysis. Stroke 2005;36(1):62-65. PMID: 15569865

10. Kent DM, Hayward RA, Griffith JL, Vijan S, Beshansky JR, Califf RM, Selker HP. An independently derived and validated predictive model for selecting patients with myocardial infarction who are likely to benefit from tissue plasminogen activator compared with streptokinase. Am J Med 2002;113:104-111. PMID: 12133748

David M. Kent, MD, MS is Founder and Director of the Tufts Predictive Analytics and Comparative Effectiveness (PACE) Center, at the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies (ICRHPS), Tufts Medical Center Director of the Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) MS/PhD Program, at the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University and Professor of Medicine, Neurology, and CTS at Tufts Medical Center/Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Kent works clinically as a hospitalist at Tufts Medical Center.

Dr. Kent is a clinician-methodologist with a broad background in clinical epidemiology, and a focus on advanced methods of predictive analytics. He has been continually funded as Principal Investigator (PI) by both the NIH, since 2003, and PCORI, since their first round of research grants in 2012. Dr. Kent has received over $25 million from these agencies, both for work addressing fundamental analytic issues, focused on prediction and personalized medicine, and for applied work in cardiovascular disease, particularly stroke. He is most known for developing frameworks for understanding heterogeneous treatment effects and for work on a particular form of stroke (PFO-associated stroke) which has changed practice guidelines worldwide. Current research projects also focus on silent brain infarction and risk of subsequent stroke and dementia using natural language processing and real world data.

Dr. Kent has served on numerous boards, including the Scientific Advisory Board at Optum Labs, Steering and Advisory Committees, DSMBs, and NIH Study Sections. He has approximately 250 articles in peer reviewed journals, including more than 20 in the top 5 general medical journals (NEJM, JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, Annals of Internal Medicine).

Finally, a substantial portion of Dr. Kent's time is spent educating the next generation of clinical and translational scientists. He has been Director of the MS/PhD Program in Clinical and Translational Science at Tufts University School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences for over a decade—where he teaches Study Design, Prediction Modeling and Real World Evidence—and has been PI / Director of multiple institutional T- and K-Awards and has personally mentored over 50 researchers, including junior faculty, fellows and students. Many of these mentees have gone on to leadership positions in academia, industry and government.

David Kent, MD

New Formula Predicts Which Stroke Patients Would Benefit From PFO Closure

New Formula Predicts Which Stroke Patients Would Benefit From PFO Closure - Read More
A drawing of research for Tufts Medical Center in downtown Boston, MA.

PACE awarded one-in-the-nation PCORI-funded Predictive Analytics Resource Center

Read about the new resource center
Hannah Lee, MD and a co-worker in gastroenterology reviewing a patient chart at Tufts Medical Center in Boston.

Making medical decisions more personal: Studying populations that are likely to benefit from health care.

Making medical decisions more personal
David Kent, MD is the Director of PACE

PACE Center the Recipient of 2 PCORI Research Grants

Learn about the awards

The Stroke-TPI

Development of the Stroke-TPI is described in the following articles:

Kent DM. Selker HP. Ruthazer R. Bluhmki E. Hacke W. The stroke--thrombolytic predictive instrument: a predictive instrument for intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke. Stroke. 37(12):2957-62, 2006 Dec.

Kent DM. Selker HP. Ruthazer R. Bluhmki E. Hacke W. Can multivariable risk-benefit profiling be used to select treatment-favorable patients for thrombolysis in stroke in the 3- to 6-hour time window? Stroke. 37(12):2963-9, 2006 Dec.

Please note that The Stroke-TPI has not been prospectively tested in clinical trials and this web-version is intended for academic not clinical use. The use of thrombolytic therapy in acute stroke should follow current guidelines together with physician judgement; rt-PA is FDA-approved for use in acute ischemic stroke only up to 3-hours from symptom onset.

SOLARIS (Selection Of Lytic Agent for Reperfusion Information System)

SOLARIS is intended to support selection of thrombolytic agent (tPA versus streptokinase) in acute myocardial infarction. Its development and testing is described in:

Kent DM, Hayward RA, Griffith JL, Vijan S, Beshansky JR, Califf RM, Selker HP . An independently derived and validated predictive model for selecting patients with myocardial infarction who are likely to benefit from tissue plasminogen activator compared with streptokinase. American Journal of Medicine 2002;113:104-11.

Kent DM, Vijan S, Hayward RA, Griffith JL, Beshansky JR, Selker HP. Tissue plasminogen activator was cost-effective compared to streptokinase only in selected patients with acute myocardial infarction. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 2004;57:843-52.